Preceptors

~ Goals for the preceptor - Testimonials ~
~ CPSO Guidelines ~

Family Practitioners and Specialists who are interested in teaching medical learners and residents are invited to become preceptors. Teaching is based on a one-to-one preceptorship model to allow learners to progress at their own pace. This facilitates maximum exposure to practice in all of its facets, including procedures. Preceptors are provided with all the necessary information to understand the program goals set by the University. Annual faculty development programs are available. Preceptors receive a stipend of $1000.00 per month per learner. ERMEP places medical learners in their clerkship years (3rd and 4th) from all Ontario Universities. These placements may vary from 4 to 12 weeks.

  Goals for the preceptor

  • To allow learners to build their knowledge through direct patient contact in a supervised and safe environment.
  • To present a professional model that demonstrates the advantages and challenges of practice in a rural community.
  • To ensure a continuation of Healthcare services in rural and regional areas of South Eastern Ontario.

  Preceptors Testimonials

"Over the past 2 years, ERMEP has placed several medical learners with me for a rural family medicine rotation.  The learners have been wonderful and I am always impressed at just how solid our next generation of doctors is going to be. Working with med learners challenges me in terms of discussing cases, demonstrating skills and generally keeping myself up to date!  It is a great feeling to see learners succeed in skills and progress in confidence over the course of the month. I would highly recommend becoming a preceptor.” - Dr. Buckley, Carleton Place

“A breath of fresh air and enthusiasm. Helps to reinforce interest in each and every patient encounter; everything is new to them.” - Dr. Judith Plante, Pembroke

“Joy of having medical students….Last November a third year medical learner did an elective with us.  This person was shy and nervous initially.  She had not had experience at suturing.  After teaching suturing and tying knots, she became a dynamo assisting in Operating Room, working in Emergency and office, what a keener!  In OR, she learned to intubate, doing it three times.  The next day a patient came in with vital signs absent and she popped the endotrachal tube in with the first try.  What excitement!  This medical learner left Renfrew on fire to experience more.” - Dr. Arthur Dick, Renfrew